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Defining your first Test Case

This documentation will walk you through the steps to define your first test case.

Prerequisites

You are required to first define your API. After this, you will end up with an API called Calculator API.

Calculator API

Click on Edit to go to the API description. You will see a sidebar similar to this:

Sidebar

There are currently no test cases listed under the Test Cases menu.

Before we create the test case, you need to know that in the endpoint you defined, you have 3 parameters involved:

Endpoint parameters

NameDescription
operationSpecifies the operation you want to perform on the input values. The valid values defined are SUM, ADD, SUBTRACT, DIVIDE
xFirst operand
ySecond operand

If we want to test the Calculate endpoint via a test case to check whether it returns the correct value on SUM operation, (e.g. 2+4 must return 6) then the test parameters with their respective values will be:

NameValue
operationSUM
x2
y4

Step 1: Create Test Case

In order to create a test case for Calculate endpoint, navigate to this endpoint from Endpoints menu and scroll down to where you can view a list of already created and enabled/disabled test cases (if any). Clicking on Create Test Case will help create the new test case.

Create Test Case

You will be taken to a new page where you can then define your test case.

Test Case Editor

Step 2: Describe Test Case

Describe Test Case

Name

This is the unique name that you can specify for your test case.

Description

This is where you can describe what your test case does.

FlagDescription
Enable TestToggling this will enable or disable the test. If the test case is not enabled, it will not be generated during code generation

Calculate Endpoint Test Case Example

As can be seen from above figure, the details for the Calculate endpoint test case are as follows:

  • Name specified is “TestSum”
  • Description specified is “Check if the endpoint returns correct sum for any two inputs”
  • Enable Test is set to true

Step 3: Define Input Parameters

Test Input Parameters

The input parameters consists of Name Value pairs defining values for parameters of the endpoint that the test case belongs to.

Name

The Name of the input parameter MUST correspond to the name of an endpoint parameter specified within definition of that endpoint.

Value

The Value MUST correspond with the type of the endpoint parameter.

FlagDescription
Is NullIf this flag is enabled or a required parameter is not provided an input value, the input parameter is given a null or zero value according to the type of the input.

Some examples of name value pairs are as below:

NameValue
someInteger1231
someStringHello, world!
someIntegerArray[1,2,3,4,5]
someBooleantrue
someModel{"name":"Bob","age":22,"uploadCount":12}
someEnumeration[123,22,125]

Note   If the endpoint has optional query parameters enabled then such type of parameters can be provided within the input parameters by preceding the Name with asterisk (*). Similarly, if the endpoint has optional field parameters enabled then such type of parameters can be provided within the input parameters by preceding the Name with a plus sign (+).

Calculate Endpoint Test Case Example

As already discussed, the Calculate endpoint contains 3 parameters. Their names will already be listed in the Name of the parameters. You need to just specify their values and decide whether to disable/enable Is Null flag.

Test Input Parameters

In the above, we specified the values for the parameters. We have disabled the Is Null for all the parameters as we do not want them to take null values as input.

Step 4: Specify Header Status

Header Status

This section lets you set header status code for the expected response.

Status Code

This refers to the expected status code of the response. The expected status can be given an exact value such as “200” or a range of values such as “20X”. This will match any status between 200 - 208 (inclusive) which are all valid HTTP status codes. Other possible HTTP status ranges are “30X”, “4XX” and “41X”. Note that only valid HTTP code values within each range will be checked.

Calculate Endpoint Test Case Example

We expect the status code to be 200 if the operation is successful, hence we input the value 200.

Step 5: Specify Expected Headers

Expected Headers

If the expected headers are specified the response is tested to see if it contains these headers. Just like with input parameters, we need to specify “Name-Value” pairs to specify header values.

FlagDescription
Check ValueThe test case will check the values of all expected headers. This flag, if enabled, will not only check the presence of a header in the response with the same name as mentioned in the Name field but will also check that the value of that response header is the same as specified in the expected header value.
Allow Extra HeadersIf this flag is disabled, it will cause the test case to fail if the response contains other headers than those listed in the expected headers list.

Calculate Endpoint Test Case Example

Expected Headers

For our Calculate endpoint test case, we will keep the expected headers empty.

Step 6: Specify Expected Body

Expected Body

The expected body helps verify if the response body matches with the one specified.

Expected Body

Whatever you expect the response to be, you input that into the Expected Body box. This could be as simple as a number, some string or can be complex like an array or some valid JSON, etc.

There are two flags related to testing arrays:

FlagDescription
Check array orderIf enabled, this will involve ensuring that the response body contains the array elements in the same order as the expected body.
Check array countIf enabled, this will ensure that the response body contains the same number of elements in the array as does the expected body.

Note   If both the flags are enabled then the arrays will be strictly checked for equality i.e. their order as well as matching lengths.

Body Match Mode

This is a dropdown menu which enlists various modes supported by APIMATIC for body matching. What modes are applicable will depend on the response type of the endpoint. The modes are:

Match ModeValid for TypesDescription
NONEAllThe expected body is ignored and the response body is not tested.
NATIVENumber, Long, Precision, Boolean and DateTimeTests the response body as a primitive type using a simple equality test. Response must match exactly except in case of arrays where array ordering and strictness can be controlled via other options.
KEYSEnumerations and Arrays of Number, Long, Precision, Boolean and DateTime typesChecks whether the response body contains the same keys as those specified in the expected body. The keys provided can be a subset of the response being received. If any key is absent in the response body, the test fails. The test generated will perform deep checking which means if the response object contains nested objects, their keys will also be tested.
KEYSANDVALUESModels, Dynamic and Arrays of Number, Long, Precision, Boolean and DateTime typesSame as the KEYS mode except values are tested as well. The values must match. Since the deep comparison is performed, nested objects must also contain the correct values. In case of nested arrays, their ordering and strictness depends on the provided options.
RAWAllThe response body is compared with the expected body via simple string checking. In case of Binary response, byte-by-byte comparison is performed. The expected body takes a URI path to a remote file to compare with the Binary response, which must be valid URI path.

Example 1 of Body Match Modes “KEYS”, “KEYSANDVALUES”:

Expected body:

{
    "name" : "bob",
    "address" : {
       "city" : "ABC"
    }
}

Response body:

{
    "name" : "bob",
    "age" : 100,
    "alive" : true,
    "address" : {
       "city" : "ABC",
       "postcode" : "21333",
    }
}
  • This will pass for both KEYS and KEYSANDVALUES mode.

Note   Response body that passes KEYSANDVALUES mode for a given expected body will also pass KEYS mode.

Example 2 of Body Match Modes “KEYS”, “KEYSANDVALUES”:

Expected body:

{
    "name" : "xxxx",
    "address" : {
       "city" : "aaaaa"
    }
}

Response body:

{
    "name" : "bob",
    "age" : 100,
   "alive" : true,
    "address" : {
       "city" : "ABC",
       "postcode" : "21333",
    }
}
  • This passes for KEYS mode.
  • This fails for KEYSANDVALUES mode.

Example 3 of Body Match Modes “KEYS”, “KEYSANDVALUES” and Array flags:

Expected body:

{
    "name" : "bob",
    "workingDays" : ["Tuesday", "Monday"]
}

Response body:

{
    "name" : "bob",
    "age" : 100,
    "alive" : true,
    "workingDays" : ["Monday", "Tuesday", "Wednesday"]
}
  • This passed for KEYS and KEYSANDVALUES mode only if both ExpectedArrayCheckCount and ExpectedArrayOrderedMatching are false.

Example 4 of Body Match Modes “KEYS”, “KEYSANDVALUES” and Array flags:

Expected body:

[
    {
       "name" : "alice",
    },
    {
       "name" : "bob",
    }
]

Response body:

[
    {
       "name" : "frank",
       "age" : 100,
       "alive" : true,
    },
    {
       "name" : "alice",
       "age" : 70,
       "alive" : true,
    },
    {
       "name" : "bob",
       "age" : 90,
       "alive" : false,
    }  
]
  • This passed for KEYS and KEYSANDVALUES mode only if both ExpectedArrayCheckCount and ExpectedArrayOrderedMatching are false.

Note   Each object from the expected body is checked for presence in response body. Note that two objects from expected body may match the same object from response body if they are subsets of that object.

Example 5 of Body Match Modes “KEYS”, “KEYSANDVALUES” and Array flags:

Expected body:

[
    {
       "name" : "bob",
    },
    {
       "name" : "alice",
    }
]

Response body:

[
    {
       "name" : "alice",
       "age" : 70,
       "alive" : true,
    },
    {
       "name" : "bob",
       "age" : 90,
       "alive" : false,
    }  
]
  • This passed for KEYS and KEYSANDVALUES mode if ExpectedArrayCheckCount is true or false.
  • This fails for KEYSANDVALUES mode if ExpectedArrayOrderedMatching is true.

Note   In case of an object array, the elements will be compared using the subset method i.e. either KEYSANDVALUES or KEYS. For primitives, simple equality comparison is used.

Calculate Endpoint Test Case Example

Expected Body

We expect the result of 2+3 as 5 hence the Expected body is given as “5”. The body matching should perform a simple string comparison between the body of the response and Expected Body to check if it contains the number “5”. This behavior matches with the mode NATIVE hence the mode chosen in NATIVE.

Step 7: Save your Test Case

Just click on “Save Test Case” at the end of the Test Case settings page and your test case along with all the settings will be saved.

Save Test Case

Congratulations! You have now successfully defined your first test case for your endpoint. To learn more on how to generate and run these testcases please refer to the Run Your First Test Case


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